Virtual Lobby Attendant: Creepy or Cool?

8 Octavia will have a virtually attended lobby, including a smartphone app (as I understand it). I’m not sure who the vendor is, but it isn’t quite what I had imagined. As it was being described to me, I imagined it was just a camera on the building exterior that routed video directly to the correct homeowner’s smartphone via an app. Basically, a videophone. I imagined a black and white screen on a dedicated intercom replaced by an app on your smartphone. But no, it isn’t that.

Video above shows the very unique window coverings at 8 Octavia. But I digress from the Virtual Lobby Attendant…

The exterior building lobby camera will be virtually attended by a real person. Someone sitting somewhere in the world where it is – one assumes – far less costly to live. On the one hand, it’s kind of cool. A real person – even if only virtually present – can distinguish package delivery folks (for example) from regular guests from cleaning teams (again, for example) and make the appropriate decision about access without further consultation. Super convenient, and far less costly to the residents so HOA dues are lower than they otherwise would be for a building with an attended lobby.

However, while it isn’t anything like the Poor Door just approved in NYC, it could easily come across as a form of economic segregation. While a virtual lobby attendant might be a buzzworthy example, we’ve witnessed the departure of thousands of formerly blue collar jobs (like Hunter’s Point Naval Station, The Bethlehem Steel shipyard, just to name a few…) over the decades. A pattern that has concentrated wealth in cities like San Francisco and concentrated poverty in the exurbs and suburbs. I doubt that any more than 25% of the lobby attendants that come to work in San Francisco buildings actually live in San Francisco. While the new technology might make it seem different, is it any different than what has already happened?

What are your thoughts about a Virtual Lobby Attendant?

Note: We are not the developer of 8 Octavia, nor do we represent the developer. The fine folks at 8 Octavia are providing the developer with exclusive representation. Want your own? Learn more.

Can you say your neighborhood has a grocery store if…?

Can you say your development has plans for a grocery store if the land it is currently on is technically a Superfund site that hasn’t yet been handed over the City/County of SF and the developer? We love The Shipyard development – don’t get us wrong, we aren’t knocking it. The current two buildings for sale in the development are The Olympia and The Merchant, both of which are located in Phase 1 of the redevelopment plan for the former Hunter’s Point Shipyard Navy Site.

Map of The Shipyard

Map of The Shipyard

We’ve written about food poverty and how the Bayview/Hunter’s Point area currently suffers from a lack of grocery stores. So when we’ve visited the sales office for the Shipyard, we always ask about grocery stores. Because we really really believe that every neighborhood needs a grocery store to be a neighborhood.

As things are currently written, the developer will be opening a small convenience store/coffee shop/corner market (although don’t call it a corner market, think of something classier) within the Phase 1 area. A larger grocery store is on the drawing board, but it is located in land that is still controlled by the Navy and is part of the site cleanup.

Which leads to the questions: can you say you’ll have a grocery store someday in the future if you don’t even yet have control of the land it is slated for?

As we do more research on the environmental side of things at The Shipyard, you can expect us to write more about this subject in the coming weeks and months. We think the development offers a lot of wonderful opportunities, but it also has a history. We think smart buyers will want to understand that history.

We’d love to hear your thoughts here on our blog, on our facebook page, or on the twitter!

135 Yukon St – Kite Hill Luxury Home

Almost all of our writing here focuses on condominiums because, well, almost all of the new home construction in San Francisco consists of condominiums. A colleague of ours, Derek Schreiber, has the listing for a beautiful modern new construction single family home in The Castro (Eureka Valley on an MLS map).

We are pleased to highlight his beautiful new listing:

135 Yukon St.

Kite Hill Luxury Home

Single Family New Construction

Asking Price: $2,995,000

The home features:

  • Four bedrooms
  • Three full baths and a powder room
  • Parking for up to 3 cars (you bring the 3 cars to verify)
  • Two master suites
  • Landscaped garden/patio + view roof deck
  • Light-filled open floor plan
  • Modern kitchen and spa-like baths

Perched atop Kite Hill and overlooking Eureka Valley, this newly-built home makes an architectural design statement both inside and out.

Offering a modern luxurious interior with top-of-the-line fixtures and finishes, this home features a warm light-filled open floor plan with Valley views from one end and a private landscaped yard to the other.

Complete with unparalleled indoor/outdoor living, seamless access to the sunny garden/patio and a jaw-dropping pano-view roof deck with views of Eureka Valley, Kite Hill, and SF skyline, this architecturally-inspired home is both private and conveniently located.

Sunday Open House:

Sunday, 6/22 2-4pm

Listing Agent Contact Information:
Derek Schreiber – Kite Hill house (property specific website)
Zephyr Real Estate
BRE# 01733507
phone: 415.385.1827
email: derek AT zephyrsf DOT com

If you don’t yet have an agent, get in touch with us and we’d be happy to arrange a showing for you or tell you our thoughts on the property after having previewed it this past week. If you’ve already got an agent, send them this link because there’s nothing more stressful than having a client send you listings from another agent’s website. Ha! :-)

I used to live on Kite Hill, and I think it is an incredibly special spot nestled in the heart of The Castro neighborhood. If you’ve got a dog, it’s a great community spot. And when it isn’t windy, dog or no dog, it offers some amazing downtown SF views.

8 Octavia Video

8 Octavia is getting ready to open it’s doors to the world, and given how close we are getting to the last Sunday in June I can’t tell you how hard it is to avoid the low-hanging gay pride weekend jokes.

Here’s a compilation of some video we took when at 8 Octavia recently. We think the operable building louvres are really interesting and…. so very, very Stanley Saitowitz (what better way to get rid of the clutter created by curtains than by putting them outside the building?!)

We’d like to thank the fine folks representing the developer at the Mark Co. for allowing us to tour the building. We don’t represent the developer. We represent buyers at new and existing construction across the city of San Francisco.

The Shipyard and 1515 15th St

Three (four?) new developments are getting some attention this weekend:

If you’d like independent representation, we must accompany you on your first visit. Sign up from a building specific page or shoot us an email: team AT jacksonfuller DOT com

1645 Pacific Rendering from SF Planning Dept. informational packet

1645 Pacific Rendering from SF Planning Dept. informational packet

 

1645 Pacific – (listing agents Victoria Davis and Doug Shaw of Pacifc Union) This building had its grand opening on Thursday night, and will look at offers on the first release of homes on June 12.

 

 

 

 

Exterior of the building

Exterior of the building

1515 15th – (listing agents Polaris Pacific) Designed by Stanley Saitowitz, this JS Sullivan development offers 1:1 parking and clean, minimalist lines and interesting bathroom layouts that make heavy use of frosted glass.

 

 

 

2014-06-04 15.56.25

The Shipyard

 

The first two buildings of The Shipyard (listing agent The Mark Co):

The Olympia: 23 condo residences that are all townhome style (two-level, with no neighbors above you, just on either side of you). Pricing for The Olympia will start in the high $600,000s. Each home will have a private garage (garages face interior courtyard) and also direct street/sidewalk access. Most homes have private outdoor space with a balcony.

The Merchant: 63 condo residences (not the townhouse-style of The Olympia). Prices for one-bedroom homes will start in the mid-$400,000′s. Two-bedroom homes will be priced beginning in the mid-$500,000′s, and three-bedroom homes will be priced beginning in the high-$600,000s. Square footages are in line with what you’d expect in most new developments right now.

A few new buildings are also about to throw themselves into the mix – so stay tuned or get in touch if you’d like us to arrange for a multi-office visit. It can be a great way to explore all your options back to back. And no, we aren’t even going to talk about The Arden. Because that falls just a hair past crazy in our humble opinion. And congratulations to all, it is a great building!!

The Mission Bay Building Madness

It’s hard to call it madness when we are short thousands and thousands of houses in San Francisco, but I’ll call it anything as long as they keep building. Not because I want to pave over meadows and destroy urban pollinators, but because increasing supply is the only realistic way out of San Francisco’s self-inflicted housing wound.

I was over on Berry street today and had a few minutes to walk along Mission Bay Channel, and grabbed the below photo:

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Most of the buildings under construction are rental developments, with the exception being the development on the right side of the picture, which is Arden by Bosa.

I know it is tough to get a sense of it on the blog, so if you want here is the full width image which is a little more fun!

The Summer Bloom?

Condominium projects across the city are getting ready to open their doors for new home buyers in San Francisco. Buyers haven’t had this many choices in new development that we can recall in recent history. Also of interest – the projects that are about to begin sales are scattered across the city from Mission Bay to Hayes Valley and Nob Hill/Cow Hollow.

The Lumina grows up with The Infinity in the background

 

Millwheel North – the latest news indicates a June opening for this development. The homes are nearly finished, so occupancy should be this summer. We’ve been keeping a close eye on this one, the last time we were there we featured some video of construction in progress.

1645 Pacific – If all goes as planned, June 9 is the date that the developer will start reviewing offers. It’s a building unlike any other we’ve seen in a while, and the attention to finishes and detail are impressive. For the artistic millionaire in all of us!

8 Octavia – The Mark Company has announced plans to open their doors in June as well. Just like Millwheel, this building is nearing completion and we would anticipate immediate occupancy once closings begin.

Arden by Bosa – We are attending a broker preview tomorrow, and while the building is a long ways from finished the sales office will be opening in…. June. We were very impressed with The Madrone and we look forward to seeing the plans for Bosa’s final Mission Bay development.

Amero SF – Also ready to sell now, with some townhouse style floor plans that are… enormous! At least, for San Francisco.

Beyond these buildings, the next big development to launch their sales will be The Lumina. The building is growing up fast, the above picture was taken about a week ago.

What developments are you excited about? We’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments here or on our facebook page or Matt’s twitter feed.

Demolition at 555 Fulton

While all of the details haven’t been worked out about the new development that will replace the office/industrial building that had been on the site, demolition has taken place at the future construction site for 555 Fulton, as you can see from the video above.

What’s one of the details that remains to be worked out? While I’m sure that there are plenty of them, the biggest sticking point is about the ground-floor tenant. As you may have read in a previous post, our city’s formula-retail restrictions have created a bit of a problem for this development.

The ground floor is reserved for a grocery store of about 12,000 square feet that would serve the neighborhood. So it doesn’t seem like it would be that challenging to find a tenant… but the grocery store needs to be “affordable” (i.e., no Whole Foods) and it can’t be a chain (no formula retail — so no Trader Joe’s, no Safeway, no Mollie Stone’s). Neighborhood groups want a locally owned, non-chain grocery store to open in the space, while the developer says that’s not an economically viable proposition.

Going on a tangent from “here’s a video of stuff getting demolished” to “buying food from small retailers,” I decided to do a little research about independent grocery stores in California, because I’m curious about how many independent grocery retailers succeed in such a high-cost state and even more specifically in our very-high-cost city. I remember when all the Cala Foods stores closed in San Francisco, leaving a complete eyesore on Haight @ Stanyan…which has now been replaced by a Whole Foods Market. As I asked google about independent grocery stores in California, one of the first hits I got was a story about the California Independent Grocers Association being merged into the California Grocers Association. Note the missing “Independent” in the name. This is definitely not a statistical analysis about the feasibility of independent grocery stores in our fair state, but I think it’s noteworthy that the independent folks teamed up with the bigger folks.

After the Fire in Mission Bay

Mission Bay made the news for a fire a few weeks ago at an apartment building that was under construction. There are some videos out there that have really good footage of the fire itself, but we wanted to share this picture taken after the fire showing how much of the debris has been removed so that the building can be rebuilt.

After the fire in Mission Bay

After the fire in Mission Bay. Photo Credit: Bob Ecker

The building is located directly across the street from the Strata apartments, and is located next to several other construction projects including the Sol apartments and Arden by Bosa, which will be the final Bosa development in Mission Bay.

You can also see the Channel Creek apartments in the top frame of the picture. It will be interesting to see if codes are changed so that temporary fire sprinklers are required earlier in the construction process. From what I understand, the fire started as a result of welding that was happening on the job site.

Given the size of the fire, it is pretty amazing that no one was killed and that the damage to surrounding buildings was so minimal.

If you live in the neighborhood and have more information or perspective on the fire, we’d love to hear your thoughts either in the comments below, or on Matt’s twitter feed or the team JacksonFuller facebook page.